Monthly Archives: October 2014

Work-Study is Valuable!

Don’t miss out on this financial opportunity!

Work-study means money in a college student’s pocket for doing campus jobs (or even off-campus jobs) that are not too demanding and possibly interesting! Students must visit their school’s financial aid department to view a list of available jobs. Then, just like with any other job, the student must apply and be interviewed. Once hired, the student will spend 10-12 hours a week earning money that has been set aside for him or her by the federal government. The college will administer the program for the government and will usually send
the student’s paycheck directly to his or her bank account.
Most students report that the work-study experience is pleasant, but if not, the student can change to another job. Some jobs allow students to study while manning an information kiosk or reception desk.
So, students should not let this valuable opportunity pass them by. I mean, where else can you get a job which must adjust itself to your schedule rather than the other way around!
Please watch my video to hear more about work-study!

The CSS Profile Lives…Again!

Born just last week, the ever-charming CSS Profile for 2015-16 is online now!

Most colleges are satisfied with the financial information they get from the FAFSA form, which is not available until January 1st of each year. But over 250 colleges and universities, the ones with big endowments, are looking for the best students they can get and they will use their funds to make it possible (or desirable) for those students to attend their institutions. The College Board administrates the CSS Profile financial aid questionaire on behalf of these schools and has a list of them at their website, https://student.collegeboard.org/css-financial-aid-profile . So whether you are applying for the first time to one of the colleges that require this form, or whether you are applying for the next school year of college financial aid, this is the time to start getting familiar with this complex form. Current high school seniors will need to start now to fill out the CSS Profile if they are going for any kind of Early Decision or Early Action. Others may have until April 15th of next year.
It’s important to understand that while the FAFSA form asks the same questions of every applicant, the CSS Profile is customizable by each participating college. Each is able to ask different specific questions to elicit the kind of detail their financial aid administrators need to dispense aid in the best way for their institution’s enrollment goals. The College Board charges a fee for each CSS Profile application, while the Federal government’s FAFSA form is free. Watch my video about the CSS Profile to get in the right mindset for this invasive, yet potentially valuable financial exercise.