Category Archives: Private Student Loans

Consolidate and Stay Cool!

Consolidate Student Loans to Stay Organized and Pay Less!

A young friend of mine just graduated from college and, even has a brand new well-paying job! And that’s not all, he’s newly married! What a lucky guy!

What’s not lucky is that he has student loans. In just 6 months he’ll be out of his grace period and will have to start paying those loans back.

What are his options?

The first thing he might want to consider is consolidating his loans.

Let’s say his loans are all federal direct loans and that some are subsidized and some aren’t. These loans were made in different school years for different amounts and at different interest rates.

So, even though he’ll probably have his loans grouped with one servicer by his lender (the U.S. Education Department), keeping up with all those different loans requires a lot of attentiveness. Mistakes can easily be made by the borrower. Or even by the servicer…shocking, right?

Consolidate Student Loans and Stay Organized

Consolidating his loans would give my young friend a far simpler repayment picture. His interest rates would be averaged and weighted into a rate nearly the same as if he had kept them all separate. Not only that, but he would gain access to at least one of the new affordable repayment plans.

Consolidate Student Loans and Get Affordable Payments

So far, the very newest repayment plan is not quite finalized, but is nearly certain to be available in December of 2015. It’s called the Revised Pay As You Earn plan, or REPAYE for short. My friend would be eligible for REPAYE and it might keep his payments down enough for he and his wife to save for their first house, and to start a family.

He would have been eligible for REPAYE’s more borrower-friendly older cousin, the PAYE plan, IF he had not gotten that well-paying job right out of college. Thanks to his new paycheck, he will not be poor enough in comparison to his student debt to get on the PAYE plan. Moreover, the ratio of wealth to debt for my friend gets even worse under REPAYE because the fed’s calculation of HIS income will include his wife’s income as well. Who knew he should have borrowed more? Just kidding!

But, no matter! Getting your student loan payment down to 10% of your JOINT discretionary income is still a wonderful thing! And, since my friend only has undergraduate loans, any remaining balance will be forgiven after 20 years. The forgiven amount could be taxable that year as income, but it’s likely this tax threat could be gone in the future, thanks to congressional efforts.

If my friend decides to consolidate all his student loans into a single Federal Direct Student Loan for simplicity’s sake and then decides to enter the REPAYE plan, he will have to understand one important fact. As a participant in the plan, he is obligated to send in a form which verifies his family’s joint income EVERY SINGLE YEAR. If he forgets the verification form, he will be placed in an alternate version of the REPAYE plan until he is jolted awake by the higher payments!

The new REPAYE plan will allow many more borrowers to get affordable payments as well, no matter when they got their loans and no matter how much money they earn. The older borrowers will need to get some of their “non-direct” federal loans, such as FFEL, consolidated into Federal Direct Consolidation loans. The biggest thing for older borrowers to remember is that Parent Plus loans cannot be included in these new Federal Direct Consolidation loans. And, even if an earlier consolidation loan paid off a Parent Plus loan, then that consolidation loan is considered “tainted”. It cannot be included in the borrower’s new Federal Direct Consolidation loan, whose purpose it is to access the REPAYE plan.

So you might be wondering why this latest round of cleverly acronym’d student loan repayment plans has come to be a dinner party topic. Here it is: REPAYE clamps down on the excesses of PAYE. Simple as that.

People had begun to game the system. Doctors, lawyers and other high student loan borrowers figured out that they could combine the generous features of PAYE with the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (PSLF). In 2017, the first of many lucky borrowers will have hundreds of thousands of student loan debt forgiven. The forgiven amounts will not be taxed.

All this system-gaming has given colleges the idea that they can raise their tuitions to match the benefits of the PAYE plan and PSLF program. Taxpayers will be on the hook for the ever-spiraling debt and tuition crisis at private non-profit colleges AND to some degree at public universities.

The cry has gone up to politicians and higher education policy-makers: Put the brakes on PAYE! So REPAYE was invented, and here we are on the brink of it’s implementation.

We can only hope that this time they got it right. I’m taking bets starting now! Who’s in?

Student Loan help right now!

Get Student Loan Help!

Now that the President has decreed a new “Student Aid Bill of Rights”, the ship of state will turn slowly toward a better way for student borrowers to manage all their loans through one portal. A new centralized complaint system will give more borrowers the ability to resolve disputes with loan servicers and debt collection agencies.

Thanks to the National Consumer Law Center and it’s Student Loan Borrower Assistance project, a prototype of this new system exists now. Watch this video to get a guided tour of how the Student Loan Borrower Assistance (.org) website links the pieces of the new system together.

If I was asked to magically build a new system to  get student loan help, I would create the new loan management portal using the building blocks provided by the the National Student Loan Data System. Currently, this system provides credentialed visitors with access to all their Federal student loan information. However, the visitor cannot find information about his/her private student loans. This is the next important task. But it’s just too hard to think about compiling private student loan information, so my magic wand would just “Make It So”!

As for the centralized complaint reporting piece of the new “Student Aid Bill of Rights”, I would just (poof!) combine the best parts of the two existing Student Loan Ombudsman offices. The Department of Education now handles complaint arbitration for Federal student loan disputes. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Student Loan Ombudsman office makes a specialty of resolving private student loan disputes. Cue the magic MixMaster!

And finally, just like the Student Loan Borrower Assistance website, I would have a whole list of free legal help right there on the new centralized complaint system website. Hey, not every student loan complaint can be resolved in a tidy fashion. What’s more, the rule against discharging student loan debt through bankruptcy looks like it’s on the table for revision. New bankruptcy rules will produce a tsunami of borrowers who will need legal guidance. Or a fairy godmother!

Become a For-Profit College Detective!

If you wanna go, you gotta know! Don’t get ripped off in the pursuit of a degree.

Thank goodness for IPEDS, the data bank of collegiate information that was created by congress some years ago. All schools have to report certain categories of information every year to this slow-moving federal behemoth (it’s about 3 years behind, but who’s counting!) Without IPEDS and a Department of Education website called College Navigator this information would not be very accessible for the public. In my video this week, I show how to use this information to detect whether an online for-profit college is doing a good job or not before a potential student makes the decision to attend it. We are in a major shake-up of the for-profit college industry (and believe me it IS an industry) and with some luck only the righteous will survive. Some of the biggest BIGS are going down in flames even as I write. Ha HA! We shall see. Meanwhile, let the buyer beware!

For Staying Out of Student Loan Debt Trouble…Knowledge Is Power!

Student loan info is the new hot commodity among financial writers.

As students are going to college for the first time, or back to college for the second, third (or even tenth) year, the number of articles I see about the issue of student loan debt are multiplying faster than I can read them online. But when an exceptionally good article appears in a real live publication in my mailbox, it’s going to get my full attention. I might even read it twice…mostly while eating (low carb, of course!). This article appears in the Fall 2014 USAA magazine, Volume 50, Number 3. It’s title is “ Escaping the Shadow of College Debt”. Here is a link to read it online: >http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pace/usaa_2014fall/#/12 . The article contains good stories about two women, who, for different reasons, got themselves into some serious student loan debt. It lays out the scope of the student loan problem and then engages the help of some of the heavy hitters in the college financial business, including Mark Kantrowitz of Edvisors Network and Lynn O’Shaughnessy, author of “The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price”. It also gets a lot of great info from the very same website I use in this episode of The College Money Mom. This website is brought to you by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a relatively new department of the U.S. government. So watch this episode to learn about the different kinds of student loans in a really easy to understand way! And, once you have this knowledge, you’ll be able to steer yourself, and others, out of harms’s way.